My City's Still Breathing

Performing the City

Through the act of performance the surrounding space is transformed, if only for a moment. In both literal and abstract fashion this panel evokes Shakespeare’s line “All the world’s a stage.” Through the power of performance, the city, or more specifically a neighbourhood, can be highlighted in a particular way, provoking a slightly elevated status upon which a new level of scrutiny is proffered. It is through the magic of art that the stories and histories of an urban streetscape become the backdrop and inspiration for a play or song. As a result, the daily experience of living in a larger urban environment is temporarily suspended in the mind’s eye, provoking contemplation, awareness and empathy about what is means to live in a smaller neighbourhood community.

Philippe Mailhot

Phillipe Mailhot (with Christine Fellows) Director Le Musee de Saint Boniface
Winnipeg, MB
Finding the "Muse" in a Museum Biography
Abstract

Philippe Mailhot

Philippe Mailhot began working with Le Musée de Saint-Boniface almost twenty-five years ago and became Director in November of 1989. During those years, he has established numerous partnerships with a variety of groups and agencies with the stated goal of heightening le Musée’s profile and assisting others to achieve their own goals. He holds a doctorate in Canadian history from the University of Manitoba, but is just as happy to be playing the role of ''roadie'' for those performers availing themselves of the Musée’s excellent acoustics. 

Finding the "Muse" in a Museum
A musical Residency at Le Musée de Saint Boniface Museum
Christine Fellows & Philippe Mailhot

Winnipeg singer/songwriter Christine Fellows joins with Museum Director Philippe Mailhot to share their respective observations on Fellows’ 6-month Winnipeg Arts Council-funded residency and commission. The commission, a song cycle and multidisciplinary performance series entitled Reliquary/Reliquaire, was presented in the Museum chapel to packed houses in September, 2009. Fellows and Mailhot’s presentation will be followed by a screening of an excerpt of the Reliquary/Reliquaire DVD, which serves as the legacy of this unique community collaboration.

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19.8 mB

Christine Fellows

Christine Fellows (with Phillipe Mailhot) Singer/Songwriter
Winnipeg, MB
Finding the "Muse" in a Museum Biography
Abstract

Christine Fellows

Christine Fellows is a singer/songwriter based in Winnipeg, Manitoba. She has released four critically acclaimed solo albums. Fellows tours internationally, creates scores for film, television, modern dance and experimental video, and she is an avid multidisciplinary collaborator. She was Artist-in-Residence at Le Musée de Saint-Boniface in Winnipeg throughout 2009, creating repertoire for a commissioned multidisciplinary performance project entitled Reliquary/Reliquaire, which was presented in a series of free, public performances in the beautiful chapel at the Museum. Reliquary/Reliquaire will be released on DVD, alongside a new full-length album entitled Femmes de chez nous, on Six Shooter Records in early 2011.

Finding the "Muse" in a Museum
A musical Residency at Le Musée de Saint Boniface Museum
Christine Fellows & Philippe Mailhot

Winnipeg singer/songwriter Christine Fellows joins with Museum Director Philippe Mailhot to share their respective observations on Fellows’ 6-month Winnipeg Arts Council-funded residency and commission. The commission, a song cycle and multidisciplinary performance series entitled Reliquary/Reliquaire, was presented in the Museum chapel to packed houses in September, 2009. Fellows and Mailhot’s presentation will be followed by a screening of an excerpt of the Reliquary/Reliquaire DVD, which serves as the legacy of this unique community collaboration.

video

4:32

video

3:09

Jim Lasko

Jim Lasko Core Artist, Redmoon Theater
Chicago, USA
Why Urban Spectacle is as Urgent as it is Cool Biography
Abstract

Jim Lasko

Jim Lasko is an artist concerned with public space.  To that end, he has applied his formal training as a theater maker to create large-scale public spectacles, parades and site specific performances, as well as interactive exhibits and installations and traditional theater shows.  

Mr. Lasko served as Artistic Director of Redmoon for 17 years.  In that capacity he led the internationally renown company’s artistic programming and was a principle collaborator in most every production.  Under new leadership, Lasko remains a core artist.

In 2009 Mr. Lasko was named the City of Chicago’s first ever Artist in Residence, an acknowledgement of his long commitment and success in creating artistic events that promote civic well being.

Some of Mr. Lasko’s most well received theater projects with Redmoon include a theatrical adaptation of Hunchback that toured the Midwest and East Coast before a successful run at the New Victory Theater in Times Square, NY.  His adaptation of Frankenstein at the Steppenwolf Theater won numerous awards and distinctions and national attention.  Cyrano, an adaptation of the classic tragedy by Rostand, was a collaborative effort with Court Theatre’s Artistic Director Charlie Newell that played at the MCA to sold out audiences for an extended run.  Once Upon a Time, a collaboration with Frank Maugeri, performed at the Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, and was the hit of the International Puppetry Festival in Charleville, France in 2009.

Redmoon’s outdoor spectacles remain some of the finest examples of Mr. Lasko’s commitment to activating public space.  Galways Shadow, converted the façade of the MCA into a giant shadow screen.  Long Live the King was enacted in and around a mobile 30 foot steel tower and toured Chicago’s neighborhoods before settling into a sold out run in Lincoln Park.  Sink, Sank, Sunk was a wild extravaganza staged at the nexus of Chicago’s multiple transportation systems. Most recently, Last of My Species played on Chicago’s lakefront as a concert collaboration with a fictional Norwegian pop-star.  

Mr. Lasko is a principle member of the international collaboration Dream Masons, whose most notable commission was their massive spectacle to celebrate the Salamanca Arts Center in Hobart, Tasmania.  

As a free-lance designer, Mr. Lasko worked with French architect Odile Compagnon to design Spertus Institute’s Grey Family Center, an interactive children’s museum built around the creative power of language.  He has been engaged to work with such diverse artists as Alexander Polyanichko and Gerard McBurney at the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and internationally regarded contemporary artist Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle.   

Mr. Lasko serves on the Advisory Board of the Chicago Children’s Museum and on the Artistic Council for the Chicago Children’s Theater.  He is an arts advisor to Children’s Memorial Hospital and is honored to continue to serve as a Director on Redmoon’s Board.  He is the recipient of numerous honors and distinctions.

Why Urban Spectacle is as Urgent as it is Cool

Jim Lasko will speak about his experience making spectacles with Redmoon in Chicago.  He will show examples of Redmoon's work in theaters, streets, Public Parks and even lagoons in an effort to articulate a philosophy of arts, urban engagement, and cultural participation.

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17 mB

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17:33

Debbie Patterson
Debbie Patterson

Debbie Patterson presents at My City's Still Breathing

Photo by Leif Norman

Debbie Patterson Playwright/Director/Actor, Winnipeg Cultural Capital Arts Ambassador (Theatre)
Winnipeg, MB
Stories of Sargent and Victor Biography
Abstract

Debbie Patterson

Debbie Patterson is a Winnipeg playwright, director and actor. Currently she is serving as Artistic Associate at Prairie Theatre Exchange and sits on the Arts Advisory Panel of the Manitoba Arts Council. She is an alumnus of  the National Theatre School of Canada and the former Artistic Director of the Popular Theatre Alliance of Manitoba.  She is a founding member of Shakespeare in the Ruins (SIR) and has been involved in most of SIR’s productions. Favourite roles have included Titania, the Nurse in Romeo and Juliet, and Jenny in Threepenny Opera.

Her musical Head, about the final days of Anne Boleyn was produced in 2006 by SIR to a completely sold out run. Her other plays include Candy From a Baby and Molotov Circus, which was nominated for the Harry Rintoul Award and the Susan Smith Blackburn Prize. She has written several adaptations for of Robert Munsch stories for Prairie Theatre Exchange which have gone on to be produced at Festival Antigonish, Carousel Theatre, Neptune Theatre, Quest Theatre, Chemainus Theatre and Bumbershoot Theatre.

Directing credits include Stripped Down Macbeth and Taming of the Shrew for SIR and Saint Joan for Theatre by the River. She lives in Winnipeg with her family: Arne MacPherson, Gislina Patterson and Solmund MacPherson.
 

Stories of Sargent and Victor

A corner of our city is still breathing, but barely.

The area around Sargent and Victor is in a critical state. The crime rate is so high that residents often feel like they're under siege. Homes are broken into repeatedly, property is vandalized, streets are routinely blocked off by yellow police tape. Teenage single moms work the streets, muggers lurk in alleyways and gang tags are spray-painted everywhere. The city was shocked by a rash of shootings in the area recently, by the tender ages of the victims and the perpetrators.

But this area wasn't always troubled. Many people remember the area as a centre of Icelandic culture and society. They talk about the First Lutheran Church and the Weevil Cafe as places where the sense of community and safety were strong and nurturing. While that aspect of this neighbourhood seems to have vanished, other aspects remain.

Morden's Chocolates has been operating out of their location on Sargent, just a few doors east of Victor since 1959. It remains a family run business. Given the current character of the area, itís difficult to imagine such a business choosing to set themselves up there now.

How does the transformation of a neighbourhood happen? How does it affect the people who live and work there? How does the land itself respond to the fear that covers it?

Debbie Patterson will share some of the stories she's collected from this area, and speak about the process she has embarked upon. Through a series of interviews she is created a verbatim theatre piece; a record of a time and place, in the words of the people, not the playwright.  She'll explore the value of drawing the stories out of the city, of giving voice to the oft-unheard.

audio

19.9 mB