Jeffrey Gibson

 

Jeffrey Gibson
 

Jeffrey Gibson is a painter and sculptor living and working in Brooklyn, New York. He was born in the United States but moved frequently and lived abroad as a child in Germany and Korea. He is also a member of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and half Cherokee. This unique combination of cultural perspectives and exposure are essential to understanding Gibson’s artworks that combine and transform seemingly disparate references drawn from both Western and non-Western sources.

Gibson received his Master of Arts degree from The Royal College of Art (UK) in 1998 and moved to New York in 1999. His paintings and sculptures have been shown nationally and internationally at museums, galleries and art fairs.  Selected exhibitions include No Reservations at The Aldrich Museum (2006), Off the Map at The National Museum of The American Indian (2007), SONOTUBE at The Santa Barbara Contemporary Arts Forum (2007), Solution at Diverseworks (2009), Totems at Sala Diaz (2009), Signs Taken for Wonders at Jack Shainman Gallery (2009), and Lover at On Stellar Rays (2009). His work has been featured and reviewed in numerous publications, including The New York Times, The Village Voice, The Boston Globe, ArtNews and The Brooklyn Rail.

Gibson received a visual arts grant from The Creative Capital Foundation in 2005 (publication with essay by Hélène Cixous), and has been awarded The Eiteljorg Museum Fellowship (catalog with essay by Jimmie Durham) and a Percent for Art commission by The Department of Cultural Affairs in New York City, both in 2009. His work can be found in many public and private collections including the Smithsonian Institution, The Denver Art Museum, The Eiteljorg Museum in Indianapolis and The School of Advanced Research in New Mexico.


Work
The Future is Present, 2011
Courtesy of the Artist and Samsøn Projects


LOCATION
Plug In ICA

Gallery

The Future is Present, 2011,  photo by Scott Benesiinaabandan The Future is Present (detail), 2011,  photo by Scott Benesiinaabandan The Future is Present (detail), 2011,  photo by Scott Benesiinaabandan The Future is Present, 2011,  photo by Scott Benesiinaabandan

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